23. Setting the Scene

Episode 24 February 11, 2018 00:25:18
23. Setting the Scene
The Latin American History Podcast
23. Setting the Scene
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Show Notes

The colony that Columbus founded on Hispaniola was by this point, well and truely up and running. While it only occupied a tiny part of what would become Spanish America, the foundations for empire were being laid. Today we take a step back from the story and examine what these foundations looked like. There were three things that would have a profound impact on the Spanish empire, the Treaty of Tordesillas, the conquistador model of conquest, and the competing motivations of the various Spanish actors. This episode examines them all.

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